Tag Archives: United States

Still at a Disadvantage

By Jake New, March 6

Throwing another wrench into the belief that higher education is the great equalizer, a new paper suggests that African-American graduates from elite institutions do only as well in getting jobs as white candidates from less-selective institutions.

The study, published in the journal Social Forces, shows that while a degree from an elite university improves all applicants’ chances at finding a well-paid job, the ease with which those jobs are obtained is not equal for black and white students even when they both graduate from an institution such as Harvard University. A white candidate with a degree from a highly selective university, the paper suggests, receives an employer response for every six résumés he or she submits. A black candidate receives a response for every eight.

White candidates with degrees from less-selective universities can expect to get a response every 9 résumés, while equally qualified black candidates need to submit 15.

“Most people would expect that if you could overcome social disadvantages and make it to Harvard against all odds, you’d be pretty set no matter what, but this experiment finds that there are still gaps,” said S. Michael Gaddis, the author of the paper and the Robert Wood Foundation Scholar in Health Policy at the University of Michigan. “Once you get out, you still have to deal with other human beings who have preconceived notions and misguided stereotypes about why you were able to go to this college.”

The paper is based on the results of an experiment Gaddis conducted in which he created more than 1,000 fake job applicants and applied to jobs online. The fictional candidates graduated from either highly selective institutions (Harvard University, Stanford University and Duke University) or less selective state universities (the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, the University of California at Riverside and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro). They all had similarly high grade point averages.

Gaddis gave the candidates names that were likely to signal to potential employers what their races were -- black male applicants were named Jalen, Lamar and DaQuan; black female applicants were named Nia, Ebony and Shanice; white male applicants were named Caleb, Charlie and Ronny; and white female applicants were named Aubrey, Erica and Lesly.

White job applicants with a degree from an elite university had the highest response rate at 18 percent. Black candidates with a degree from an elite university had a response rate of 13 percent, with white candidates holding a degree from a less-selective university following closely at nearly 12 percent. Black applicants with a degree from a less-selective institution had a response rate of less than 7 percent.

Black graduates at elite colleges not only had a response rate similar to that of white graduates from less-selective institutions, but the employers who responded to black applicants were often offering jobs with less prestige and with salaries that trailed those of white candidates by an average of $3,000. “Education apparently has its limits, because even a Harvard degree cannot make DaQuan as enticing as Charlie to employers,” Gaddis wrote.

While the experiment could not measure the odds of applicants landing a job after getting an initial response, Gaddis said, gaps this large at just the first step of the process demonstrate that “a bachelor's degree, even one from an elite institution, cannot fully counteract the importance of race in the labor market.” How welcoming a company is to diverse applicants once they meet and interview them means little if they can’t even get in the front door.

“It’s quite possible that these differences are not suggesting that employers are going about trying not to hire black applicants, but there is something going on this lower level,” Gaddis said. “I hope that maybe this research will make people stop and think about what processes we are using when hiring.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/03/06/elite-college-degrees-give-black-graduates-little-advantage-job-market

Smart Ways to Save Money on a U.S. Bachelors Degree

The cost of a U.S. Bachelors ranges from $10k a year at community colleges to $55k a year at expensive institutions. As the cost of college sky rockets, students and parents are looking more closely at value versus investment. Here are three ideas that both domestic and international students can do to reduce the cost of earning a U.S Bachelor's degree:

1. Many U.S. colleges and universities offer online courses that you can take from home in your first or second semester. If you can take a few courses without being on campus in your first year, go for it. For international students, this means staying at home with your parents while taking U.S classes. It is a great idea and can save you significant dollars. You save on boarding and lodging while earning a U.S degree. Can't beat that!

2. Many international students don't know about community colleges or they have a bad impression about community colleges.  Even after you enroll in a 4-year university, you can still take some courses at a community college and have them transferred. This will also save you some money.

3.  Some universities have campuses around the world that offer the same degree as they do in the U.S. See if a campus is less expensive and take a few courses at that campus. This has multiple benefits. In your resume you can say that you have lived and experienced different cultures and countries. This is invaluable. Also, you earn the same degree for a lower cost. And you may be able to select a country that is closer to your home country, making travel back and forth less expensive.

 

Masters in the USA

The Graduate School LibraryImage via Wikipedia

There are many graduate schools in the US. Students have plenty of choices in terms of what they want to study. The other good thing about US graduate programs is that some amount of funding or scholarships are usually available to good students. A great website for information about graduate programs is the Council of Graduate Schools at http://www.cgsnet.org/Default.aspx?tabid=359

Best wishes!

Dr. Uma G. Gupta is the CEO and Founder of PlanetGPA

Enhanced by Zemanta

Study Pharmacy in US

Pravin Sahebrao Pagar said...

Pharmacy Rx symbolImage via Wikipedia

sir/madam, i am student of pharmacy studying in final(4th) year. I want to known how i will get admission in M.S.in pharma.at U.S. University.i still dosent face any test like GRE, TOFEL, ILTS, GMAT.please suggest me which exam. should i take in order to get admission in good university with offering good stipend and how much score requires.

Dear Pravin,

The Doctorate of Pharmancy (there is no Master's in Pharmacy) is a highly competitive field. This is because of the abundance of jobs in pharmacy! However, at the current time, there is more demand than supply of Pharmacy universities in the US. This is changing as more pharmacy universities in US will open over the next few years. Your best bet is to do well on GRE and TOEFL. Getting financial aid is difficult. Work hard on improving your written and oral communication skills. University of California, San Francisco has a great pharmacy program. http://pharmacy.ucsf.edu/pharmd/ Best wishes to you!

Enhanced by Zemanta